Nonduality: The Varieties of Expression




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#3747 - Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - Editor: Gloria Lee

The Nonduality Highlights -
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights      

"I slept and dreamt that life was joy. But I awoke, and saw that life was service. I acted, and behold: service was joy." - R. Tagore   Papaji says: Happiness doesn´t ask anything of you. But to suffer you must make some effort at relationship. You must refer to some relationship with a person, thing or idea in order to suffer. Then you get unhappy because you need something. To be happy is your fundamental nature. Nothing is needed.

from
Michaela Friedrich on Facebook    

Ran across this quote yesterday. It's one of the pleasantly startling realizations of Awakening: "If you don't see God in everyone, you don't see God at all." – Yogi Bhajan  

from Jeff Belyea on Facebook  


The Wish to Be Happy

If we are practicing metta and we cannot see the goodness in ourselves or in someone else, then we reflect on the fundamental wish to be happy that underlies all action. “Just as I want to be happy, all beings want to be happy.” This reflection gives rise to openness, awareness, and love. As we commit to these values, we become embodiments of a lineage that stretches back through beginningless time. All good people of all time have wanted to express openness, awareness, and love. With every phrase of metta we are declaring our alignment with these values.
- Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness
 


Being, Not Becoming

The Tibetan Buddhist tradition defines renunciation as accepting what comes into our lives and letting go of what leaves our lives. To renounce in this sense is to come into a state of simple being. We have a moment of seeing, a moment of hearing, tasting, touching, smelling, thinking—just a moment, and then it is gone. When we look very carefully, we see that our experience is like a cascade of impressions. If we rely upon any one of these transiencies for a sense of permanent satisfaction, we lose the happiness of simply being. Just imagine for a moment the stillness and peace of not leaning forward even for the next breath. This is being, rather than becoming, and this is the power and fullness of metta.
-Sharon Salzberg, Lovingkindness


Day-to-Day

Perhaps we'd much rather focus on a great transcendent state of consciousness out there somewhere, waiting for us to achieve it. But it is in how we live day-to-day that an authentic spirituality is made manifest.
- Sharon Salzberg, The Force of Kindness


Awareness  

“Awareness is complete perceptual openness in all experience. It is freedom in immediate perception rather than being focused on stories. The whole field of perception opens up in timeless awareness to include all perceptions. We may find ourselves having a lot of thoughts and a lot of emotions, even very strong emotions that we could have never tolerated before we began gaining confidence in awareness. This is the source of compassion : to allow everything about ourselves to be as it is. “
 
Great Freedom

http://satsangs.net/key/words.html

 posted to OpenAwareness by Rob Matthews


The Power of Patience


There is great power in patience because it cuts through arrogance and ingratitude. It is the path that lets us move from resistance to acceptance and spontaneous presence. Holding on to our judgments about others and ourselves is a major cause of impatience. Repeating softly to ourselves, “May I be happy just as I am” and “May I be peaceful with whatever is happening” helps us accept our vulnerabilities, imperfections, and losses: everything from chronic physical and emotional pain, to the death of loved ones, the end of a job or relationship—even nightmare traffic jams.
- Michele McDonald, "Finding Patience,"


   

Little of Me

Let only that little be left of me
whereby I may name thee my all.

Let only that little be left of my will
whereby I may feel thee on every side,
and come to thee in everything,
and offer to thee my love every moment.

Let only that little be left of me
whereby I may never hide thee.
Let only that little of my fetters be left
whereby I am bound with thy will,
and thy purpose is carried out in my life
and that is the fetter of thy love.  

Rabindranath Tagore

 

photo by Alan Larus

http://ferryfee.com/Bluesky/Islands/Little_of_Me.htm

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