Nonduality: The Varieties of Expression




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THE NATURAL BLISS OF BEING

       

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#3846 - Thursday, March 25, 2010 - Editor: Gloria Lee

The Nonduality Highlights -
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights  

"Muddy water is best cleared by leaving it alone." Alan Watts

   


  As regards the quietude of the sage, he is not
quiet because quietness is said to be good.  He
is quiet because the multitude of things cannot
disturb his quietude.  When water is still, one's
beard and eyebrows are reflected in it.  A skilled
carpenter uses it in a level to obtain measurement.
If still water is so clear, how much more are the
mental faculties!  The mind of a sage is the mirror
of heaven and earth in which all things are reflected.

                               - Chuang-Tzu

posted to Along The Way  


   Mullah Nasrudin, standing on the bank of a river, watched as a dog came to drink. The dog saw itself in the water and immediately began to bark.  It barked and barked all morning and into the afternoon, until it was foaming at the mouth. Finally, dying of thirst, the dog fell into the river--whereupon it quenched its thirst, climbed out, and happily walked away.

Nasrudin said, "Thus I realized all my life I had been barking at my own reflection."  

posted to Wisdom-l by Mark Scorelle


Enjoying Nature
Enjoy nature in whatever way you can, and share that joy with others. Put up a bird feeder. Take a child or an elderly person to the park—somebody who couldn't get there by themselves. Children have less opportunity to run wild in nature than they did when I was a child. Vacant lots and ditches are hard to come by, and where they exist, they are often polluted or unsafe. So take some kids you love to a place they can run around unsupervised, forming their own connection with dirt and twigs and bugs and hollow trees. Next thing you know, they'll be sitting up in a redwood tree for a couple of years.
- Susan Moon, "Stop Shopping,"
 


      Perhaps the World Ends Here   The world begins at a kitchen table.  No matter what,
we must eat to live.
 
The gifts of earth are brought and prepared, set on the
table so it has been since creation, and it will go on.
 
We chase chickens or dogs away from it.  Babies teethe
at the corners.  They scrape their knees under it.
 
It is here that children are given instructions on what
it means to be human.  We make men at it,
we make women.
 
At this table we gossip, recall enemies and the ghosts
of lovers.
 
Our dreams drink coffee with us as they put their arms
around our children.  They laugh with us at our poor
falling-down selves and as we put ourselves back
together once again at the table.
 
This table has been a house in the rain, an umbrella
in the sun.
 
Wars have begun and ended at this table.  It is a place
to hide in the shadow of terror.  A place to celebrate
the terrible victory.
 
We have given birth on this table, and have prepared
our parents for burial here.
 
At this table we sing with joy, with sorrow.
We pray of suffering and remorse.
We give thanks.
 
Perhaps the world will end at the kitchen table,
while we are laughing and crying,
eating of the last sweet bite.
 
~ Joy Harjo ~
 
 
  (Reinventing the Enemy's Language)  
Web version: www.panhala.net/Archive/Perhaps_the_World_Ends_Here.html

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