Nonduality: The Varieties of Expression




HOME


SPONSORS


ONE, by Jerry Katz

Photography by Jerry Katz

Dr. Robert Puff

THE NATURAL BLISS OF BEING

       

Rupert Spira

DISSOLVED, Tarun Sardana

HIGH JUMP, Tarun Sardana


Greg Goode -
After Awareness: The End of the Path




Consider joining our Facebook discussion community, Nonduality Salon, going on 20 years of active participation. We were the first online discussion group dedicated to nonduality in a popular sense.

Click here to go to the next issue

Highlights Home Page | Receive the Nonduality Highlights each day

Digest
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4640 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-06-29
Subject: #4640 - Friday, June 29, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
#4640 -В В Friday, June 29, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
В 
В 

В 
В 
Notice of an interview with Gary Falk, today, Friday. AВ really goodВ article about Richard Rohr. And news from Sentient Publications about books and a conference on compassion.
В 
The interview with Gary Falk should be very interesting and possibly irreverent. He is a long time member of, and contributor to, Nonduality Salon, which alone would make him a unique interview.
В 
В 

В 
Via Kelly Sammy:

If you are so inclined, tune in Friday, June 29th: 10-11 AM PST//1-2 PM EST at

http://www.AcimGatherRadio.org/

where I will be interviewing Gary Falk -- on his journey of unfolding.

If you follow the link and directions to paltalk you can come in to the chat
area and interact LIVE Hope you JOIN US

ACIM Gather
www.AcimGatherRadio.org
В 
~ ~ ~
В 
Gary writes:

If you are interested in checking out Kelly, here's here Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nurture-Your-Soul/190746237649795

This is one interview that I will definitely not miss. I just can't wait to
find out how I am unfolding.

Gary


В 
В 

Non-DualisticВ Thinking

June 28, 2012 by Susan Stabile

One final post prompted by my reading of Richard RohrÂ’s Falling Upwards.

Rohr gives one the simplest, yet completely accurate description of dualistic thinking. He writes that dualistic thinking is the “well-practiced pattern of knowing most things by comparison. And for some reason, once you compare or label things (that is, judge) you almost always conclude that one is good and the other is less good or even bad.”

Rohr presents “seven CÂ’s of delusion, suggesting that the dualistic mind compares, competes, conflicts, conspires, condemns, cancels out any contrary evidence, and crucifies with impunity.

In contrast, when we grow into nondualistic thinking (he also uses the terms contemplative thinking and both-and thinking), “you no longer need to divide the field of every moment between up and down, totally right or totally wrong, with me or against me. It just is. This calm allows you to confront what must be confronted with even greater clarity and incisiveness.

Dualistic thinking is not inherently bad. Rohr suggests it is very helpful – even necessary – in the first half of life. The hope, however, is that as we move to the second-half of life, we can grow from dualistic thinking to nondualistic thinking. “Nondualistic thinking presumes that you have first mastered dualistic clarity, but also found it insufficient for the really big issues like love, suffering, death, God, and any notion of infinity. In short, we need both.”

For what it is worth, regarding how we move to nondualistic thinking, I think RohrÂ’s The Naked Now: Learning to See as the Mystics See is an wonderful book to read.

В 


Read the latest newsletterВ from Sentient Publications:

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=7kubw6bab&v=001jZ0SncZoWrPJtQsQA-2jH-_An7_DRcULf3nk0fdyrpiLE5otxKSVMoJT7cTLAjb9btDE68yLkP8VPCHFegcDPpHsJ7KjBAf9vsIL8K70NP8%3D

(Don't worry, it's a real link!)

Here areВ a few things you'll find in the newsletter:

30% Off on New Release and Award Winner
В 
FREE SHIPPING on all U.S. ordersВ 
В 

New Release:


SCHOOL STRUGGLES
A Guide To Your Shut-down Learner's Success
В 
Richard Selznick, PhD
В В В В В В 
School Struggles, Dr. Richard Selznick's follow-up to the acclaimed The Shut-Down Learner, details a broader scope of potential problems faced by schoolchildren and offers techniques and insights to help them learn. Dr. Selznick explores reading and writing issues, behavioral problems, difficulties with organization, social skills, medication, parents' interactions with teachers, excessive use of technology, the importance of patience, and more. The practical, down-to-earth tone and helpful, easily applicable tools make this book a godsend for parents staying awake at night worrying about their child's learning and school experience.В 

В 
New Award Winner!В 

The Tao of Walt Whitman won the Gold Award in the Mind, Body, and Spirit category for ForeWord Reviews, a journal dedicated to reviewing independently published books. The book was selected by dozens of librarians and booksellers who are experts in the subject matter of the books they judged, and who make purchasing decisions daily for their collections or bookstores.В 

Walt Whitman's radiant poetry is a source of contemporary inspiration. His ecumenical wisdom, which includes both transcendentalism and realism, is encapsulated here in short verses for each day of the year. These, along with a daily action step, become a springboard for readers to transform themselves. The sublime poetry combined with exercises for self-reflection will make this unique pocket-sized daybook a constant companion for those seeking greater balance in their lives.


Upcoming Event


On July 19-22 in Telluride, Colorado, Sentient Publications will be partnering with The Stanford University Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) to present The Science of Compassion: Origins, Measures and Interventions, the first large-scale international conference of its kind dedicated to study of compassion. The event will provide an unprecedented gathering of leading experts in research on compassion, altruism, social connection and service to discuss their latest findings. The conference will explore the origins of compassion and compassionate action, how it can be measured, and how we can foster it through interventions.

The conference is open to researchers and the general public. Among the presenters are key figures in Psychology such as Dr. Phil Zimbardo and keynote speakers Dr. Richard Davidson, pioneering researcher on meditation and brain function, and Dr. Paul Ekman, groundbreaking emotion researcher.В  Other invited speakers include such distinguished scholars as Thupten Jinpa Langri (His Holiness the Dalai Lama's long-time translator).В 

Get details here:

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=7kubw6bab&v=001jZ0SncZoWrPJtQsQA-2jH-_An7_DRcULf3nk0fdyrpiLE5otxKSVMoJT7cTLAjb9btDE68yLkP8VPCHFegcDPpHsJ7KjBAf9vsIL8K70NP8%3D

Group: NDhighlights Message: 4641 From: Mark Date: 2012-07-01
Subject: #4641 - Saturday, June 30, 2012
Archived issues of the NDHighlights are available online: http://nonduality.com/hlhome.htm

Nonduality Highlights Issue #4641, Saturday, June 30, 2012





The summer's grass!
all that's left
of ancient warriors' dreams.

- Matsuo Basho




The true student of the Way clings neither to Buddha, nor to Bodhisattvas, nor to Arhats; he clings not to anything that passes as supreme in the Three Worlds. He keeps his distance, stands alone and free, and is not bothered by things. Though heaven and earth be turned upside down, he will not be bewildered. Though all the Buddhas of the ten directions appear before him, he will not care. And if the three deepest hells47 suddenly gape before him, he will not be afraid.

Why not? Because he sees everything as empty.

If there is change, there is also existence. Without change, there is nothing. "The Three Worlds are the heart only; The ten thousand things are but its differentiation." This is why it is said: "Dreams and phantoms, flowers in the empty sky; why trouble yourself to seize them?"

Followers of the Way, the one right here before your eyes and listening to the Dharma is he who "enters fire without being burnt, goes into water without being drowned, and plays about in the three deepest hells, as if in a fairground; he enters the world of Pretas and dumb animals without being molested by them." Why is this so? Because there is nothing he dislikes. If you love the sacred and dislike the worldly, you will go on floating and sinking in the ocean of birth and death. The passions arise depending on the heart. If the heart is stilled, where then do you seize the passions? Do not tire yourselves by making up discriminations, and quite naturally, of itself, you will find the Way.

- excerpt from The Zen Teaching of Rinzai, translated by Irmgard Schloegl.




True person manifest throughout the ten quarters of the world

The true person is
Not anyone in particular;
But, like the deep blue color
Of the limitless sky,
It is everyone, everywhere in the world.

- Eihei Dogen, English version by Steven Heine




It seems to be such a great task -- it is not, but it appears to be a great task -- to transform your blindness into clear perceptive eyes; to transform your darkness into beautiful morning light. It is a simple thing, the simplest in the world, but just because it is simple, it does not appeal to the mind. Mind is interested in doing great things. The desire behind every ambition of the mind is to be special. And you can be special only with special achievements.

The problem with Zen is that it wants you to be utterly simple, not special. It goes against the very desire of the mind, which is not a small phenomenon -- it is a four-million-yearsold desire, which everybody is carrying in different lives. Mind cannot understand why you should be simple when you could be special, why you should be humble when you could be powerful. And mind is heavy, it has the great weight of the past. The moment the mind sees anyone humble, simple, natural, a buddha, it immediately condemns him, because such a man goes against the whole makeup of the human mind. And in a way the mind is right. To be a buddha you will have to drop the mind completely, you will have to become an empty mirror.

- Osho, from Ma Tzu: The Empty Mirror - Talks on Zen




It has to be understood that buddhahood cannot be attained, it is already your nature. If you try to attain it, you will miss it. You have just to relax and see within yourself, and the buddha is already there in its absolute splendor.

The use of the word `attain' means that something has to be done, you have to go somewhere. There is a possibility of failure - you may succeed, you may not succeed. And attainment is always of the outside world, of the objective world - riches, or fame, or power...

But buddhahood is not an attainment. It is simply a remembrance, as if you had forgotten something, and suddenly in a silent relaxed state you remember it.

- Osho, from Ma Tzu: The Empty Mirror - Talks on Zen




Group: NDhighlights Message: 4642 From: Mark Date: 2012-07-02
Subject: #4642 - Sunday, July 1, 2012
Archived issues of the NDHighlights are available online: http://nonduality.com/hlhome.htm

Nonduality Highlights Issue #4642, Sunday, July 1, 2012





A man on his deathbed left instructions
for dividing up his goods among his three sons.
He had devoted his entire spirit to those sons.
They stood like cypress trees around him,
quiet and strong.

He told the town judge,
"Whichever of my sons is laziest,
give him all the inheritance."

Then he died, and the judge turned to the three,
"Each of you must give some account of your laziness,
so I can understand just how you are lazy."

Mystics are experts in laziness. They rely on it,
because they continually see God working all around them.
The harvest keeps coming in, yet they
never even did the plowing!

"Come on. Say something about the ways you are lazy."

Every spoken word is a covering for the inner self.
A little curtain-flick no wider than a slice
of roast meat can reveal hundreds of exploding suns.
Even if what is being said is trivial and wrong,
the listener hears the source. One breeze comes
from across a garden. Another from across the ash-heap.
Think how different the voices of the fox
and the lion, and what they tell you!

Hearing someone is lifting the lid off the cooking pot.
You learn what's for supper. Though some people
can know just by the smell, a sweet stew
from a sour soup cooked with vinegar.

A man taps a clay pot before he buys it
to know by the sound if it has a crack.

The eldest of the three brothers told the judge.
"I can know a man by his voice,
and if he won't speak,
I wait three days, and then I know him intuitively."

The second brother, "I know him when he speaks,
and if he won't talk, I strike up a conversation."

"But what if he knows that trick?" asked the judge.

Which reminds me of the mother who tells her child,
"When you are walking through the graveyard at night
and you see a boogeyman, run at it,
and it will go away."

"But what," replies the child, "if the boogeyman's
mother has told it to do the same thing?
Boogeymen have mothers too."

The second brother had no answer.

The judge then asked the youngest brother,
What if a man cannot be made to say anything?
How do you learn his hidden nature?"

I sit in front of him in silence,
and set up a ladder made of patience,
and if in his presence a language from beyond joy
and beyond grief begins to pour from my chest,
I know that his soul is as deep and bright
as the star Canopus rising over Yemen.
And so when I start speaking a powerful right arm
of words sweeping down, I know him from what I say,
and how I say it, because there's a window open
between us, mixing the night air of our beings."

The youngest was, obviously,
the laziest. He won.

- Rumi Mathnawi VI: 4876-4916, version by Coleman Barks from The Essential Rumi, posted to Sunlight




Group: NDhighlights Message: 4643 From: Gloria Lee Date: 2012-07-03
Subject: #4643 - Monday, July 2, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
#4643 -В Monday, July 2, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
В 
В 
В 
В 
There are no conditions to fulfil. There is nothing to be done, nothing to be given
up. Just look and remember, whatever you perceive is not you, nor yours. It is
there in the field of consciousness, but you are not the field and its contents,
nor even the knower of the field. It is your idea that you have to do things that
entangles you in the results of your efforts - the motive, the desire, the failure
to achieve, the sense of frustration - all this holds you back. Simply look at
whatever happens and know that you are beyond it.
В 
- Nisargadatta Maharaj
В 
via Along The Way
В 

В 
В 
В 
В 
"What, then, constitutes the path? It is simply holding to one's own place in the
immediacy of one's own situation. What constitutes realization? It is simply
understanding correctly one's own true nature as the fundamental nature of
reality. What constitutes freedom? It is awakening to inherently enlightened
being in one's own true nature. Exerting effort otherwise, conceiving of the
state of freedom and the environment of freedom as something else, one is
extremely confused. Since in ultimate reality no context exists upon which to
base the slightest speculation concerning the goal, there is the absence of
speculation, another doorway to liberation."
В 
- Dudjom Lingpa
В 
From the book, "Buddhahood Without Meditation,"
published by Padma Publishing
via Daily Dharma
В 

В 
В 
If you're wise, be foolish.
If you can see, squint.
В 
Though you can hear, sit
dumb as an old rock.
В 
Whatever anyone says,
listen and agree.
В 
This is a friendly practice,
and it leads to some truth.
В 
В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В  - Lalla
В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В  14th Century North Indian mystic
В 
From "Naked Song"
Versions by Coleman Barks
via Along The Way
В 

В 
В 
The Lion's Roar is the fearless proclamation that any state of mind, including the
emotions, is a workable situation, a reminder in the practice of meditation. We
realize that chaotic situations must not be rejected. Nor must we regard them as
regressive, as a return to confusion. We must respect whatever happens to our
state of mind. Chaos should be regarded as extremely good news.
В 
- Chogyam Trungpa
В 
From the book, "The Myth of Freedom and the Way of Meditation,"
published by Shambhala
В 
В 
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4644 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-07-05
Subject: #4644 - Wednesday, July 4, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
#4644 - Wednesday, July 4, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
The Nonduality Highlights - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights
В 
В 

В 
В 
In this issue you'll have the opportunity to read the Introduction, Chapter One, and Index to Colin Drake's new book, Awakening and Beyond.
В 
В 

В 
В 
Comments for the writings of Colin Drake, which areВ part ofВ his new book:
В 
Great article (Love loving Itself). Thanks. Love, Isaac ShapiroВ 
В 
Superb article. Fantastically well put. So simple any 'one' could get it! – Piers Mooreede
В 
As usual, this is an exceptionally lucid and practical discussion of the ephemeral “I” and the changeless Reality which underlies all. Well done! – Don Wolfe
В 
В 

В 
В 
Introducing a new book by Colin Drake: Awakening and Beyond: Self Recognition and its Consequences.
В 
Colin now has three books in the series. They are available as e-books or in hard copy.
В 
The Introduction and Index to Awakening and Beyond are featured in this issue.
В 
For complete details and ordering information please visit
В 
В 
В 
В 
В 
Awakening and Beyond, by Colin Drake, is a series of articles written since the publication of the Author's second book A Light Unto Your Self. It is the third in the trilogy which started with Beyond the Separate Self. Each book deals with Awakening, from the dream of being a separate object on the earth, and each is written so as to stand alone Г‚вЂฆ not requiring the reader to have read the other works.
В 
Introduction to Awakening and Beyond
В 
This book is the follow up to Beyond The Separate Self and A Light Unto Your Self. All of these books deal with self-identity, Г‚вЂ˜Who am I?Â’; which is vital, for without a clear idea of oneÂ’s essential identity one cannot relate to the world, and others, in an appropriate way. To give a stark example: we have all heard of people who are incarcerated because they believe they are Jesus Christ, or Napoleon Bonaparte say, and it is fairly apparent that any relationship to such a person will be somewhat unusual to say the least! In the same way whilst we believe that we are separate objects, in a universe of separate objects, then we will naturally treat ourselves and others as objects, which I think we can see to be an unsatisfactory arrangement. For this tends to lead to blatant self-interest and exploitation of our fellow beings, the outcome of which is apparent in the modern world.
В 
So the quest is to inquire and discover that which is beyond objectification, the deeper level that is the perceiver, the subjective level in which objects (thoughts and sensations) come and go. This is easily achieved by directly investigating our moment to moment experience, and the previous books provided a simple framework in which this investigation may be easily carried out, see appendix 1. Beyond The Separate Self also included a series of contemplations delving more deeply into what is discovered, and chapters on how to live from this deeper subjective level. A light Unto Your Self continues this whilst concentrating on the need to discover for oneself so that no outside authority is necessary. It also provides a series of contemplations on how to cultivate the first awakening which is the outcome of the initial investigation, and on how to Г‚вЂ˜applyÂ’ this awakening to our day to day existence.
В 
This book continues this theme whilst providing pointers as to what can be expected when one is Г‚вЂ˜awakeÂ’ and some of the outcomes of awakening. It also stresses the need for continued cultivation of this, for we have all lived for so long misidentifying as a separate being that we readily Г‚вЂ˜nod offÂ’ again requiring another awakening. The author knows this only too well and makes no claim to Г‚вЂ˜lack of sleepÂ’! However, when one is awake one is awake Г‚вЂฆ so that anything that is discovered, or encountered, in this awakened condition is a valid topic in the smorgasbord that is Awakening and Beyond. For more on this see chapter six: Г‚вЂ˜Are there Different Degrees of Awakening?Â’
В 
Much of the information in the following articles relies on the discovery that our body/minds are instruments through which Consciousness can sense, contemplate, experience, act in, engage with and enjoy Its manifestation. The chapter from A Light Unto Your Self , which deals with this, has been included as appendix 2 and it would be advisable to read the appendices first.
В 
Chapter one considers the concept that staying awake is like Г‚вЂ˜walking along a razorÂ’s edgeÂ’ as has been defined in The Upanishads and was the topic of a famous novel by Somerset Maugham. Or as Jesus is purported to say: “Strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.” (Matthew 7 v.10) The thrust of this chapter is that awakening is actually remarkably simple, see appendix 1 (Investigation of Experience) which outlines the framework for investigating oneÂ’s moment to moment experience. It also highlights how easy it is to fall asleep again and in this respect staying awake could be said to be like Г‚вЂ˜walking a razorÂ’s edgeÂ’. Luckily however, re-awakening is even easier than the first awakening and so Г‚вЂ˜nodding offÂ’ is not a problem provided one continually wakes up again Г‚вЂฆ
В 
Chapter two considers the looming global environmental catastrophe and posits that humanity can only overcome this by solving the problems of overpopulation and the unsustainable exploitation of the earthÂ’s mineral resources. These are caused by those old chestnuts - lust and greed - and this chapter considers how these may be reduced by awakening to our true identity.
В 
Chapter three is concerned with debunking the myth that we need to achieve union (yoga) or integration with the Absolute, for when the subject is examined there is no separation to be found, and thus no union or integration is possible.
В 
Chapter four deals with giving up our personal Г‚вЂ˜storyÂ’ of a separate being (object) and seeing this as it actually is Г‚вЂฆ just a story.
В 
Chapter five is the answer to a question I received, the gist of which is: If I identify with Awareness why would I want to do anything? The answer concerns the function of conscious beings and the purpose of life itself. This was the first article in a set of four I wrote for the spiritual Г‚вЂ˜blogÂ’ of Hanumandass.
В 
Chapter six is the second of these which deals with the questions of whether there are different degrees of awakening, and whether awakening is gradual or sudden.
В 
Chapter seven is the third in the series and is my answer to the question: Is practice necessary? The article deals with this on three levels –body, mind and awakening.
В 
Chapter eight is the last in this series which deals with the problem of identifying oneself as seeker, or practitioner. It also highlights the essential meaningless of labels that attempt to categorize human beings, and deals with the pitfalls of Г‚вЂ˜reading meaning into things that have no meaningÂ’.
В 
Chapter nine is a dialogue between myself and Hanumandass which resulted from my answering his blogged question: Г‚вЂ˜how to apply nondual Awareness to the external world?Â’ The gist of my answer was that one does not (need to) apply this in the normal way, for once one awakens then this changes oneÂ’s relations with, and interaction in, the external world for the better. To back this up I sent him a poem on the subject - Awakening is Immensely Practical – which had a profound effect.
В 
Chapter ten is an attempt at a logical proof of the assertion that Г‚вЂ˜I am AwarenessÂ’. It gives a set of premises to back this up and also presents the proof in the Aristotelian format – premise one, premise two, conclusion.
Chapter eleven is a dialogue between myself and a reader of Beyond The Separate Self who greatly appreciated the book but was still continually overcome by memories and negative thought patterns.
В 
Chapter twelve was written for a website called Г‚вЂ˜The Awakened EyeÂ’ www.theawkenedeye.com which is dedicated to the visual arts created by those who have had some degree of awakening, and also to the fact that creating artworks can foster this awakening. It deals with the general subject of Г‚вЂ˜Awareness and CreativityÂ’.
В 
Chapter thirteen is my response to a critic who questioned the fact that awakening was freely available to those who were prepared to investigate reality for themselves, and who also asserted that one had to renounce the world of form to achieve peace (by awakening).
В 
Chapter fourteen is a dialogue with a reader of A Light Unto Your Self which concerns viewing oneÂ’s negative emotions from (identifying with) pure Awareness, how to allow the old thought patterns (that create these) to just come and go without buying into them. It also considers the fact that as one awakens oneÂ’s emotions gradually change, allowing for the enjoyment of the positive ones whilst letting the negative ones go.
В 
Chapter fifteen is a dialogue with a German professor who had enjoyed a first awakening but was unsure of its veracity. So he asked a series of questions concerning the link between (identifying as) Awareness and awakening.
В 
Chapter sixteen is a poem I wrote in praise of (Universal) Consciousness in its two modes – at rest as Awareness- and in motion as cosmic energy (manifestation). In Hindu mythology the first of these is denoted by Siva and the second by Sakti.
В 
Chapter seventeen consists of my answers to a set of questions posed by Jerry Katz, my first e-book publisher, who was writing a book on Г‚вЂ˜Life After AwakeningÂ’.
В 
Chapter eighteen deals with Г‚вЂ˜the universe and consciousnessÂ’ from a scientific point of view and attempts to show how this agrees with the model of nonduality: that there is only consciousness existing in two states - still, as Awareness, and in motion, as energy.
В 
Chapter nineteen considers whether Г‚вЂ˜sitting meditationÂ’, which entails concentration on a mantra, or a symbol, or the breath is of any use in achieving freedom. Or, whether it is counter-productive as it posits something (in the future) to achieve when the concentration deepens, thus positing that freedom is not already here. Whereas, freedom is always Г‚вЂ˜here and nowÂ’ just requiring the recognition of its presence.
В 
Chapter twenty reflects on Г‚вЂ˜good and evilÂ’ and attempts to show that they both stem from the same motivation, that of becoming happy, or fulfilled. Their outward expression varies depending on the state of comparative Г‚вЂ˜awakeningÂ’ exhibited by the doer.
В 
Chapter twenty-one asks the question of whether a Guru, in the traditional sense, is necessary on the path of Jnana-Yoga (knowledge) or self-inquiry.
В 
Chapter twenty-two attempts to show that Г‚вЂ˜LoveÂ’ can be defined as the state of Г‚вЂ˜No SeparationÂ’ between the lover and the beloved.
В 
Chapter twenty-three is an exercise using the body/mind as an instrument through which the lover – consciousness at rest, pure awareness – and the beloved – consciousness in motion, the manifestation – can Г‚вЂ˜knowÂ’ and love each other.
В 
Chapter twenty-four posits that the realization of the Absolute, by investigation of experience, leads to nirvana. Or you could say that nirvana is synonymous with being totally identified as, and with, Awareness - The Absolute Reality.
В 
Chapter twenty-five considers how two nondual perspectives, Buddhism and Advaita Vedanta, through the Upanishads, reflect and inform one another.
В 
Awakening and Beyond
В 
$7.95 in PDF format

Buy Beyond the Separate Self, A Light Unto Your Self, and Awakening and Beyond, all 3 for $18
В 
Order Colin Drake's books as hard copy paperbacks:
В 
В 

В 
Awakening and Beyond, by Colin Drake
В 
Chapter One
В 
The RazorÂ’s Edge

It has long been held that following the spiritual life to its goal, complete awakening, is very difficult, like walking along a razorÂ’s edge.В  This chapter addresses this and attempts to show that, whilst experiencing the first awakening is very simple and easy, to live this awakening requires great vigilance like walking a tight rope.В 
В 
Let the wise merge the speech in the mind, and the mind into intelligence (philosophical reason); let him merge intelligence in the great self (pure Awareness), and that self into peace.
Katha Upanishad – 1.3.13
В 
This signifies recognizing that thoughts (mind), sensations and actions (speech in this case) appear in (and are seen by) Awareness i.e.В  are merged in that.В  This is to be discovered by Г‚вЂ˜direct seeingÂ’ which is informed by intelligence.В  Then by the same process one can discover that Awareness, being always totally still and utterly silent, is always completely at peace.В  This is all fairly straightforward and easy to Г‚вЂ˜seeÂ’ as appendix 1 (Investigation of Experience), from Beyond the Separate Self (and A Light Unto Your Self) attempts to show.В 
В 
Arise, awake, enlighten yourself by resorting to the great (teachers), for that path is sharp as a razorÂ’s, difficult to tread
and hard to go by, say the wise.
В Katha Upanishad – 1.3.14
В 
This next verse says that the path of Г‚вЂ˜direct seeingÂ’ is sharp as a razorÂ’s edge and thus we should abandon this and resort to the great teachers.В  However, this advice itself is very difficult to follow for the modern sceptical Western mind which does not trust anything that lies outside its own experience or Г‚вЂ˜direct seeingÂ’.В  Also the teachings of the great are often difficult to follow being somewhat cryptic and needing interpretation.В  resulting in different opinions leading to schisms and the formation of sects.В  From this also comes tribalism based on Г‚вЂ˜our teacher is the bestÂ’ or Г‚вЂ˜our interpretation is the correct oneÂ’ and the whole sorry saga of division and competition is perpetuated!
В 
So based on this I think, on balance, we are better off following BuddhaÂ’s final teaching which was that one is to become Г‚вЂ˜a light unto yourselfÂ’.В  Sankara agreed with this when he wrote, in the Vivekachudamani (verse 54):
The true form of Reality should be known through oneÂ’s own bodhacaksu, clear eye of understanding, and not through a scholar; the true form of the moon should be known by means of oneÂ’s own eyes only; how can it be known by proxy?
В 
This Г‚вЂ˜knowingÂ’ (of Reality) requires the Г‚вЂ˜direct seeingÂ’ of our essential nature by self-inquiry or Г‚вЂ˜investigation of our moment to
moment experienceÂ’ – see appendix 1.В  Which results in an Г‚вЂ˜awakened momentÂ’ when one sees that deeper than thoughts (mind) and body (mind) one is pure Awareness and the ramifications of this seeing can be amazing.В  However, due to our habitual identification with the body/mind one soon Г‚вЂ˜nods offÂ’ again requiring a further awakening by self-inquiry or investigation of experience.В  So to become Г‚вЂ˜totally awakeÂ’ requires absolute vigilance and commitment, akin to walking a razorÂ’s edge.В 
В 
However, this is not a problem, for as the periods of Г‚вЂ˜wakefulnessÂ’ (which are totally carefree) increase so will the commitment to identifying with the level of pure Awareness.В  This will lead to more reflection and investigation, resulting in further awakenings which will continue the process.В  To call it a process may seem a misnomer for when one is Г‚вЂ˜awakeÂ’ thereÂ’s no process going on, but the continual naps keep the whole thing running.
В 
This does require us to be more interested in awakening than in our own Г‚вЂ˜personal storyÂ’, and to prefer peace to mental suffering.В  It is amazing how many people prefer to identify with the story and suffering, seeming to actually enjoy them in a masochistic fashion.В  Assuming that this is not the case one can use mental suffering to be a wake up call that one has Г‚вЂ˜noddedÂ’ off again and return one to Г‚вЂ˜Awareness of AwarenessÂ’.В  So although staying awake is like walking a razorÂ’s edge it is very easy to see when one has slipped off this and to hop back on again!
В 
There is another danger for those that feel that they have Г‚вЂ˜awakenedÂ’ and that is spiritual pride based on the thought that “now IÂ’ve really got it” and thus cannot fall off the edge.В  It is easy to see that this thought “now IÂ’ve really got it” is dualistic involving a Г‚вЂ˜meÂ’ thatÂ’s got something (else).В  This is the difference between thinking Г‚вЂ˜now IÂ’ve really got AwarenessÂ’ and directly seeing that one is Awareness itself.В  Any thought that objectifies the Г‚вЂ˜IÂ’ is to be avoided, for Awareness is not an object but the constant conscious subjective presence.В  Once again vigilance is the key Г‚вЂฆ
В 
Thirdly for those of us who attempt to point to awakening there is another greater danger, which is believing that we are (separate individuals) pointing Г‚вЂฆ This belief can easily be strengthened by the appreciation that we receive by those who experience awakened moments based on this pointing.В  As Г‚вЂ˜awakeningÂ’ is the most profound seeing that can occur, often with momentous implications, the gratitude expressed is often of the most lavish proportions.В  So we need to Г‚вЂ˜walk the walkÂ’ by continually realizing that we are ephemeral manifestations of That (consciousness), through which pointing is taking place, and that no separate Г‚вЂ˜pointerÂ’ exists!
В 
In conclusion, Г‚вЂ˜awakeningÂ’ is straightforward and available to all, but is quickly countered by nodding off again.В  So we need to constantly reawaken by becoming aware of, and identified with, Awareness itself.В  In this respect it is like walking a razorÂ’s edge, but it is not painful and hopping back on again is simplicity itself by the relevant shifting of attention from thoughts/sensations to the Awareness that sees these.В  However, to become fully awake requires for this repeated seeing to occur until we finally no longer nod off again and this entails utmost vigilance.В  Papaji, Sri Ramana MaharshiÂ’s direct disciple, was asked whether he still had to remain vigilant and he replied Г‚вЂ˜with every breathÂ’.
В 
~ ~ ~
В 
Read the index to Awakening and Beyond:
В 
В 
~ ~ ~
В 
Awakening and Beyond
В 
$7.95 in PDF format

Buy Beyond the Separate Self, A Light Unto Your Self, and Awakening and Beyond, all 3 for $18
В 
Order Colin Drake's books as hard copy paperbacks:
В 
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4645 From: Gloria Lee Date: 2012-07-06
Subject: #4645 - Thursday, July 5, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee

#4645 -В Thursday, July 5, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
В 
В 
В 
В 
If we surrendered to earth's intelligence we could rise up rooted, like trees.
В 
~ Rainer Maria Rilke
В 
photo by Alan Larus
В 
В 
В 
Pollen of Forget Me Not
В 
When curtain falls and light does fade
each part is to perfection played
The actor has no choice but say:
Now please, conclude the silent way
В 

To never ever ask for more
One boat, one oar, oh little flame
Consumed upon the other shore
В 
From promise of forget-me-not -
one hour on that sand
В 
В 
В 
I praise this land,
the winding road we came,
the open door
В 
The precious few
The passing hand to hand
В 
~ Alan Larus
В 

В 
Hacking Back to the Wild: A Testimonial by Deborah Westmoreland
В 
Chapter One- The Underbrush
В 
What does one make of a casual day starting in a casual way when somehow
between the coffee and the sky hands go absent into a sea of fur and trees and
cardinals, finches, wind rushes, and rosa banks so green in the everlasting that no
moment is another. Then walking into a room where kismet speaks straight out of
Rumi something like the moment I heard my first love story, I started looking for
you, and didnÂ’t know what to do but sit there in awe, not knowing how blind that
was, face all fallen into the palms of my hands when something asked me to look up
and I knew what was never right was about to be the rightest damn thing ever, so I
looked up and took the blessing smack in the middle of my face, lovers don't finally
meet somewhere, they're in each other all along, so paralyzed from that moment on
that you went on to have your way with me and had me speaking all my secrets
around some fire with strangers who had been my brothers and sisters for all this
time anyway. I wondered where my own backyard was after all, and you couldnÂ’t
help but laugh at me as you picked me up out of the wonderment you stunned me
with. I think I drove home that night or maybe you drove home for me. I donÂ’t
know. I remember it was the first time I didnÂ’t know what time it was or where I
was suppose to be or how many days until I needed to pay some bill. I thought
about packing my favorite sweater, a couple pair of shoes, and a good coat and
getting way out of town while the getting was good. I remember there was a lot of
joy. So much joy I wondered if someone had finally filled me up with a good dose of
smack and how the buzz ran right up through every vertebrae til it blew the top of
my head off just like Emily Dickinson said it would because poetry–the poetry that
forms around every moment never to appear again–wasn't going to leave me like I
was. And I begged to be taken down; flattened under foot; to see the back of my
eyes but that was gone, too. Everything was gone. Long gone with all the tidy little
questions, all the vain perplexing hopes and twisted wants, and pent-up opinions,
and circumstantial evidence. Being so much more than the henpecked way of the
mind taking me down like a visitor about to spar with the strongest townie in that
dark bar–but oh so grateful to take the beating, to stop the ever-revolving
mundane questions posed as important visions to living the good life of pride and
protocol. All punched up and awake, I made some half-stalled attempt at driving
100 miles out of town then turned around to find some new place that was the old
place. There was only a blanket, a rug, two dogs, and your divine voice saying,
“Here you are.”
В 
And now I want to give you more than just a preemptive strike at living. Now I
shift from the unbalanced foot of fear to the handstand of irreversible love, all
the while walking upside-down towards that barely-there plank of sometimes
always, to see the abyss as my final bed; your heartbeat–the volcano and the fury
and the splendor of the freefall.
В 
Chapter Two- Night Sky
В 
Whirling in this current of abyss. In the river, I swim directionless, omni-present
and never-present, in a world where computer screens seem as heads and heads
seem as outputs and indicators of me, everything reflecting back to me. I move and
the world moves, along this horizon, this aureole, my halo, undifferentiated, radiant.
Beautiful. More and more beautiful. Alone and unconcerned, without a thought of
my own, I watch. Nothing disturbs. Forgetting language and incapable of
recognizing words, I find walks and laughter my glad friends, my doppelgangers;
everything rambling with me as apparition, counterpart, twin, double, twofold of no
fold. Replicate, repeat, divide, then disintegrate.
В 
But other images arise—bright faces and tender words, smiles, and the gestures of
hands and lips, arms embracing me. The hellos and the how are yous and the sit with
mes.
В 
Mute, as tongueless as time, I ask questions to the Divine. High Indifference is not
all there is to know. I grow anxious about attachments to others or, rather, no
apparent attachment to those I love. I grow close without the strings of feelings.
Consciousness brings intimacy as a wave I am to experience in all its intricate and
remarkable ways. Yet where is my heart? Fear of never acting takes hold. I ask,
'What of this?' and wait. There is nothing but Consciousness and Empty-ness...still
I wait on its ways.
В 
Night comes and so does the vast and starry sky. The rosette nebula opens from
inside of me. Before me and within me, the gases of the galaxies sing a refrain of
origin from where I am—brilliant hues of heavens and lights, ephemeral clouds in
colors as soft as eyelids and lilies, as dark as fire and longing. I weep because This
is wide and unfathomable. Because This is my heart. In this void I am finally
introduced to God and Love, to the wonder of Other. I succumb to Nothingness, to
the Divine. I lose dimension and the lens grows large, distorted like a fisheye with
infinitely more to reveal. I've always been in heaven. To deny anything as mere
perfection is the sin and the sorrow.
В 
Chapter Three- Through the Thickets, Shangri-La
В 
There is the loss of self, there is the knowing God and loving God, and then there is
that immutable Light—the clear penetration, drilling down until the floodsprings
burst, undammed. Uncoiled, uprooted, unfettered, loosened, freed.
В 
In a fateful second, unrecognizable that I was about to be weighted by the secret
of life, desiring of nothing, content to be without self and to know Love, I placed
my face on a cold metal fence and peered into the woods.
В 
Thick and heavy with old barks and pine needles, swelling buds of deciduous trees,
and birdsong swirling all around, a dogwood flowered before me in the midst of
such tender grooved leaves. Four white-cupped petals, tipped by a faint crimson,
fully-bloomed announced, in unison, the verdant floret crown centered in the
bracts beauty. A flowering so revered since childhood, never did I pull one from
its branches. A symbol of the way. Crucifixion. Death. Resurrection. Life.
В 
In that moment which is this moment, my heart spoke to everything, this loud outcry
to creation, Г‚вЂ˜I am Source.Â’ Never moved. Never moving. Never to move. Without
dimension, the tracing finger of All— infinitesimal in its workings. Stateless.
Formless. Explosive. This point, this stillness. Home.
В 
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4646 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-07-06
Subject: #4646 - Friday, July 6, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
#4646 - Friday, July 6, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
The Nonduality Highlights - В http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/
В 
В 

В 
В 
I discovered this review on Cory Bright's Facebook page.
В 
В 
В 
В 
Spira, Rupert. Presence: The Art of Peace and Happiness, Volume 1. (2011) Salisbury: Non-Duality Press.
В 
Reviewed by John Prendergast, Ph.D.
В 
In this important new book Rupert Spira offers a deeply eloquent, insightful and mature exploration into the heart of experience that takes a subtle step beyond his earlier The Transparency of Things. At first he covers the familiar ground of the futile search for happiness and the discovery of true nature from a traditional Advaita perspective, although expressed with an unusual freshness and clarity. For example:
В 
"The history of humanity on an individual and collective scale is the drama of this loss of our true identity and the subsequent search to regain it."
В 
"Every direction turns out to be the wrong direction. It is like standing up and trying to take a step towards oneÂ’s body; every step is the wrong direction."
В 
"In fact, all experience is intimately close to our self; closer than close. There is only our self. Only knowingness."
В 
"When it is said that awareness is Г‚вЂ˜underlyingÂ’, it is a half-truth spoken to one who deeply believes in the separate existence of objects. In fact, awareness is not just Г‚вЂ˜underlying.Â’ It is also, as it were, Г‚вЂ˜on the surfaceÂ’. That is, it is not just the witnessing background but also the substantial foreground of all seeming things."
В 
"Love is normally conceived of as the quality of intimacy that characterizes a small handful of relationships, connecting one person to another, whereas it is, in fact, the natural condition of all relationship, of all experience."
В 
There are some enjoyable flashes of humor as well, including speculation that there may one day be a diagnosis of SSS - Separate Self Syndrome:
В 
"The longing for happiness and the fear of death are, in fact, two aspects of the same syndrome. The syndrome is the imaginary inside self. Future generations may one day diagnose SSS - Separate Self Syndrome from which the vast majority of humanity suffers and which is the main cause of most psychological unhappiness."
В 
The book becomes most valuable, however, when it breaks from traditional teachings and addresses the reality of the residues that the imagined separate sense of self leaves on the feeling level of the body, even after an initial mental awakening. He frames the matter clearly:
В 
"The exotic name for this understanding is enlightenment or awakening, but it is more simply the knowing of our own being; its knowing of itself. It is the end of ignorance - the ignoring of our true nature. Because this understanding was, until recently, more fully explored and explained in foreign cultures it is often associated with the cultural conditioning with which it was expressed. This inevitably led to many misunderstandings as the cultural conditioning was not clearly distinguished from the universal nature of the truth that was being pointed at. One of the main misunderstandings is the belief that when it becomes clear that there is not a separate inside self, the expressions of ignorance that dominated the body and mind for so long immediately come to an end. This is not so."
В 
"To begin with, the investigation may be confined to our thoughts, but long after it has become
clear that the separate self does not reside in the mind, the feeling that it is located in the body
usually remains. In fact, by far the larger part of the imaginary inside self is made out of this
feeling. This realization may precipitate a much deeper exploration of the sense of a self inside
the body."
В 
"In most cases this re-orchestration of the body and mind takes place gradually, but
occasionally the change is dramatic. As a result of such a dramatic change the body and mind
may become disoriented and the loss of the familiar structures in which we invest our identity
may result in fear and even panic. At this point the desire to return to the old habits of thinking
and feeling as a source of security may be strong and, if succumbed to, will allow the imaginary
self to reassert itself again. However, if we have the courage and the love to remain in the
openness and unfamiliarity of this new landscape, the fear will subside, leaving us in our true
nature of peace and happiness. In time, the residues of the separate self are gradually washed
out of the body and the mind, not through any effort or discipline but simply because they are
no longer being fed and reinforced by the belief in the reality of such a self."
В 
This critical point is often overlooked by those who may have broken through identification with
thought but for whom this understanding has yet to penetrate deeply into the feeling of the body. The
understanding is not fully experiential and a strange denial may ensue which uses the philosophy of
nonduality to dismiss or rationalize continuing reactivity:
В 
Read more relevant quotes and the remainder of the review here:
В 
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4647 From: Mark Date: 2012-07-08
Subject: #4647 - Saturday, July 7, 2012

Archived issues of the NDHighlights are available online: http://nonduality.com/hlhome.htm

Nonduality Highlights Issue #4647, Saturday, July 7, 2012





Where can we go to find God if we cannot see Him in our own hearts and in every living being.

- Swami Vivekananda, posted to The_Now2




Nobody doubts that he exists, though he may doubt the existence of God. If he finds out the truth about himself and discovers his own source, this is all that is required.

- Ramana Maharshi, from The Collected Works of Sri Ramana Maharshi, posted to The_Now2




There is no need to go to India or anywhere else to find peace. You will find that deep place of silence right in your room, your garden or even your bathtub.

- Elizabeth Kubler Ross, posted to DailyDharma




You already are intimately familiar with your true Self - simply stay with that pure light of aliveness, that very simple and ordinary sense of being. Watch how the thoughts and assumptions seem to color this pure light of Self with identification, yet these can only come and go BECAUSE OF this pure Self that you are.

- Randall Friend, posted to AlongTheWay




In fact, there is no body, nor a world to contain it; there is only a mental condition, a dream-like state, easy to drop by questioning its reality.

- Nisargadatta Maharaj, posted to ANetofJewels



Group: NDhighlights Message: 4648 From: Mark Date: 2012-07-08
Subject: #4648 - Sunday, July 8, 2012

Archived issues of the NDHighlights are available online: http://nonduality.com/hlhome.htm

Nonduality Highlights Issue #4648, Sunday, July 8, 2012





Jean, I find you and your teaching interesting for a number of reasons. For one thing, you are a Westerner who went to India long before such journeys were common and ended up attaining a high degree of realization. What prompted you to go to India?

I was hoping to find a society where people lived without conflict. Also, I think, I was hoping to find a center in myself that was free from conflict – the kind of forefeeling or foretaste of truth.

While in India, you found a teacher with whom you studied for a number of years. What is the value of a teacher for the spiritual life?

A teacher is one who lives free from the idea or image of being somebody. There is only function; there's no one who functions. It's a loving relationship; the teacher is like a friend.

Why is that important for someone on the spiritual path?

Because generally the relationship with other people involves asking or demanding - sex, money, psychological or biological security. Then suddenly you meet someone who doesn't ask or demand anything of you; there is only giving. A true teacher doesn't take himself for a teacher, and he doesn't take his pupil for a pupil. When neither one takes himself to be something, there is a coming together, a oneness. And in this oneness, transmission takes place. Otherwise the teacher will remain a teacher through the pupil, and the pupil will always remain a pupil.В  When the image of being something is absent, one is completely in the world but not of the world; completely in society, but at the same time free from society. We are truly a creative element when we can be in society in this way.

What did your teacher teach you?

The teacher brings clarity of mind. That's very important. There comes a moment when the mind has no reference and just stops, naturally, simply. There's a silence which you more and more live knowingly.

And the teacher shows you how to do that. Did you learn any meditation or yoga techniques from your teacher?

No. Because what you really are is never achieved through technique. You go away from what you are when you use technique.

What about the whole notion of the spiritual path - the idea that you enter a path, follow a certain prescribed way of practice, and eventually achieve some goal?

It belongs to psychology, to the realm of the mind. These are sweets for the mind.

What about the argument that if you don't practice, you can't attain anything?

You must first see that in all practice you project the goal, a result. And in projecting a result you remain constantly in the representation of what you project. What you are fundamentally is a natural giving up. The mind becomes clear, there is a giving up, a stillness, fulfilled with a current of love. As long as there is a meditator, there's no meditation. When the meditator disappears, there is meditation.

So by practicing some meditation technique, you're somehow interfering with that giving up.

Absolutely.

How?

You interfere because you think there is something to attain. But in reality what you are fundamentally is nothing to obtain, nothing to achieve. You can only achieve something that remains in the mind, knowledge. You must see the difference. Being yourself has nothing to do with accumulating knowledge. In certain traditions - Zen, for one - you have to meditate in order to exhaust the mind; through meditating the mind eventually wears itself out and comes to rest. Then a kind of opening takes place.

But you're suggesting that the process of meditating somehow gets in the way of this opening.

Yes. This practicing is still produced by will. For me, the point of meditation is only to look for the meditator. When we find out that the meditator, the one who looks for God, for beauty, for peace, is only a product of the brain and that there is nothing to find, there is a giving up. What remains is a current of silence. You can never come to this silence through practice, through achievement. Enlightenment - being understanding - is instantaneous.

Once you attain this enlightenment or this current do you then exist in it all the time?

Constantly. But it's not a state. When there's a state, there is mind.

So in the midst of this current there is also activity?

Oh, yes. Activity and non-activity. Timeless awareness is the life behind all activity and non-activity. Activity and non-activity are more or less superimpositions upon this (and) constrain beingness. It is behind the three states of waking, dreaming, and sleeping, beyond inhalation and exhalation. Of course, the words "beyond" and "behind" have a spatial connotation that does not belong to this beingness.

In the midst of all activity, then, you're aware of this presence, this clarity.

Yes, "presence" is a good word. You are presence, but you are not aware of it.

You've often called what you teach the direct way, and you contrast it with what you call progressive teachings, including the classical yoga tradition and most forms of Buddhism. What is the danger of progressive teachings, why do you think the direct way is closer to the truth?

In the progressive way, you use various techniques and gradually attain higher and higher states but you remain constantly in the mind, the subject - object relationship. Even when you give up the last object, we still remain in the duality of subject and object. You're still in a kind of blank state, and this blank state itself becomes an extremely subtle object. In this state, it is very difficult to give up the subject - object relationship. Once you've attained it, you're locked into it, fixed to it. There's a kind of quietness, but there's no flavor, no taste. To bring it to the point where the object vanishes and you abide in the beingness, a tremendous teacher or exceptional circumstances are necessary. In the direct approach, you face the ultimate directly, and the conditioning gradually loses its impact. That takes time.

So the ultimate melts the conditioning.

Yes. There's a giving up, and in the end you remain in beingness.

You say that any kind of practice is a hindrance, but at the same time you suggest practices to people. You teach a form of yoga to your students, and to some you recommend self-inquiry, such as the question, "Who am I?" It sounds paradoxical - no practice, but you teach a practice. What practices do you teach, and why do you use practices at all?

To try to practice and to try not to practice are both practice. I would rather say listen, be attentive, and see that you really are not attentive. When you see in certain moments in daily life that you are not attentive, in those moments you are attentive. Then see how you function. That is very important. Be completely objective. Don't judge, compare, criticize, evaluate. Become more and more accustomed to listening. Listen to your body, without judging, without reference - just listen. Listen to all the situations in daily life. Listen from the whole mind, not from a mind divided by positive and negative. Look from the whole, the global. Students generally observe that most of the time they are not in this listening, although our natural way of behavior is listening.

The path you are describing is often called the "high path with no railing" which is the most difficult path of all. The average person would not know where to begin to do what you're talking about. Most could probably be attentive to their inattention, but after that, what? There's nothing to grasp onto.

No, there's nothing to grasp, nothing to find. But it is only apparently a difficult path; actually, I would say it is the easiest path.

How so?

Listening to something is easy, because it doesn't go through the mind. It is our natural behavior. Evaluation, comparison, is very difficult, because it involves mental effort. In this listening there is a welcoming of all that happens, an unfolding, and this unfolding, this welcoming, is timeless. All that you welcome appears in this timelessness, and there is a moment when you feel yourself timeless, feel yourself in welcoming, feel yourself in listening, in attention. Because attention has its own taste, its own flavor. There's attention to something, there's also attention in which there's no object: nothing to see, nothing to hear, nothing to teach, only attention.

And in that moment of pure attention, you realize the one who's being attentive?

I would say that this attention, completely free from choice and reflection, refers to itself. Because it is essentially timeless.

The Zen master Dogan said: "Take the backward step that turns your light inwardly to illuminate the self." That seems to be similar to what you're talking about.

Yes, but one must be careful. Turning the head inwardly is still doing something. There's really no inward and no outward.

I noticed that you use the word "attention." Is this the same as what the Buddhists call mindfulness - being acutely aware of every moment, every sensation every thought?

Mindfulness mainly emphasizes the object, the perceived, and not perceiving, which can never be an object, just as the eye can never see its seeing. The attention I'm speaking of is objectless, directionless, and in it all that is perceived exists potentially. Mindfulness implies a subject-object relation, but attention is nondual. Mindfulness is intentional; attention is the real state of the mind, free from volition.

- excerpt from "Be Who You Are: An Interview with Jean Klein," by Stephan Bodian in Undivided: The Online Journal of Nonduality and PsychologyВ 


Group: NDhighlights Message: 4649 From: Gloria Lee Date: 2012-07-09
Subject: #4649 - Monday, July 9, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee

#4649 -В Monday, July 9, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
В 
В 
Dhanya Ji and I were already discussing the use of her story when Mark Otter's issue
arrived on Sunday with excerpts from this very article she mentions. Love when that happens.
Her more personal observations shed a different light on the man.

Today I read the following article about Jean Klein written by Stephen Bodian.
http://undividedjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Be-Who-You-Are-An-Interview-with-Jean-Klein-by-Stephan-Bodian2.pdf
В 
It reminded me of the brief time I spent with Jean to whom I was introduced by a
kind friend. The following is a story a wrote about my brief but deeply meaningful
time with Jean:
В 
1916(?) to 1998
В 
"One day you will find that you are the ultimate subject," Jean Klein
В 
I met Jean Klein in the spring of 1995. A friend of mine had served as his
attendant and traveled with him for many years. Jean gave a talk in our town. I
went to hear him and was impressed. I telephoned my friend and said, “I know Jean
doesnÂ’t have any more public programs scheduled on this visit, but are there any
private meetings I could attend?”
В 
He said, “Why donÂ’t you just come over to the hotel and meet him.” When I walked
into the hotel garden Jean was sitting under an umbrella. A quiet gentle man with a
strong underlying presence. He seemed to be enjoying watching some children
splashing and playing in the pool. A silence permeated the atmosphere around him.
В 
My friend introduced us. Jean smiled and took my hand in his. We went up to his
room, slowly walking through the corridor and into the elevator. Jean gracious and
courtly, his arm linked in mine.
В 
We reached his room and sat on the couch while my friend prepared lunch in the
little kitchen. I asked Jean "What is this subject/object relationship you were
speaking of?" He tried to tell me, but I couldnÂ’t understand.
В 
I was invitedВ to stay and eat with them. Afterwards, I felt that I would also like
to cook something for Jean. I asked Jean if he liked Greek food, and he said,
“Yes!” I went home and made him some delicious spanakopita. It took forever to
make, and I was regretting the time spent away from him.
В 
When I walked into his hotel room with my dish Jean said, “You are an angel.”
В 
“Not really," I thought. But who was I to contradict him?
В 
I came back the next day with some flowers. Jean was returning home. As he was
leaving, Jean told my friendВ to bring the flowers, “Take care of them,” he said, “There is
a lot of love in those flowers.” That surprised me.
В 
As he got into the car, Jean paused for a moment looking at our beautiful mountain,
the sky, the scenery. He took a deep breath and said, “I donÂ’t want to leave this
place." "Then donÂ’t," I said. He just looked at me and smiled. He never returned.
В 
Sometime later I received a phone call asking me if I would like to come to Santa
Barbara and cook for JeanÂ’s “Day of Listening,” a meeting at his house attended by
his old students.
В 
So, I cooked for JeanÂ’s "Day of Listening". After the meeting Leif took me into
JeanÂ’s room. Jean was very pleased with the day and the food. Leif told him, “She
enjoyed cooking for you, Jean.” Jean looked at me and said, “Maybe we should
adopt you.” “Yes, please,” I thought. I stayed on in Santa Barbara for about two
weeks cooking lunch and dinner for Jean, the others of the household, occasional
guests and visitors.
В 
Jean had a very refined aesthetic sense. He liked everything to be lovely, just so.
He wore Swiss hand-made leather shoes, cashmere sweaters, and expensive silk
cravats. He loved art and music. He enjoyed fine food, and fine conversation. I had
never met a teacher like him. He was very gallant, and would always insist on
holding a door open for a lady, even when he himself could barely stand unaided.
В 
In the evening when I returned to a friendÂ’s house to sleep, I was aware of being
gently surrounded by the same quiet subtle vibrations I had experienced in JeanÂ’s
presence.
В 
Jean didnÂ’t care to be alone much. We had a fun game we used to play with him. He
had a film script he was working on in his head. It went something like this: A
young man and woman meet in their very early youth. They fall in love, become
lovers, but somehow outward circumstances, perhaps the war, separate them.
Twenty years later they meet again. An instant attraction is felt. They become
lovers, but neither one recognizes the other as the love of their youth. Then, Jean
would say, there would be some geste (French for gesture) the woman would make.
A geste she had always done, that was hers alone, and by which her lover
recognizes her.
В 
What was this gesture? Jean could never find one good enough. “Some geste," he
would say, brushing his hair back from his forehead with an elegant sweep of his
hand. We spent a lot of happy hours with Jean trying to come up with a geste he
liked, but we never could find one that satisfied his aesthetic sense.
В 
He once told us a nice story about watching some nuns walking across a misty lawn
on their way to early morning prayer. I said to him, “Some people say that all are
women compared to God" "That," he said, “is a little bit suspect.”
В 
At dinner Jean would often say, “Are we going to have something nice to drink?”
This was the signal to open a bottle of Chardonnay. Jean would usually have about
a thimbleful, while the rest of us had a glass or two. Drunkenness would never have
been tolerated. Just a little loosening of some peopleÂ’s reticent awe of him to get
the conversation flowing.
В 
One evening there were about six or seven of us at dinner. Each person began to
describe their first meeting with Jean and what that meeting meant to them. Of
course, these were JeanÂ’s old students and close people, so what they had to say
was quite profound. At one point I looked over at Jean who was sitting next to me.
He was sitting still as a statue, his eyes wide open staring at the wall opposite.
Tears were silently rolling down his face.
В 
One day while sitting in conversation with Jean in the garden, I reconnected with
an intuitive appreciation for natural beauty I had had as a child, but which had
become inaccessible to me during my adolescence. A old contraction subtly
released, and I recognized that a part of myself, a dear and valuable friend,
long-missed had returned.
В 
One night after dinner I was sitting on the couch with Jean watching parts of the
O.J. Simpson trial on CNN. Jean said that of course O.J. had done it, but he would
never be convicted. I piped up some statistic about the huge number of young
black men incarcerated by our legal system, trying to impress Jean with my liberal
views and point out the negative aspects of American culture.
В 
Jean gave me a brief, intense, almost quizzical, look. I wondered what it meant.
Later, when I returned to my home, I realized that a piece of conditioning I had
long carried (noticed only by itÂ’s absence) had fallen away, and in itÂ’s place was a
great appreciation for the beautiful diversity of human existence.
В 
One afternoon Jean came home. He had missed lunch and was terribly hungry. I
hadn't expect him to eat lunch with us, and hadn't saved any food for him. I told
him there was some left over penne pasta in the fridge that I could heat up. He
nodded his assent asking me to hurry. I quickly heated up the pasta on the stove,
and put a piece in my mouth to see if it was hot enough. Just as I had the piece in
my mouth, it fell back into the pot, and I had no idea where it landed.
В 
To many people this might not seem a big deal. But I had been trained to cook many
years before by a very orthodox Hindu brahman. One wasn't even allowed to taste
the food before offering it to the diety or guru (same thing in their minds). Having
a piece that had been in my mouth fall back in the pot from the Hindu standpoint
made the whole thing Г‚вЂ˜juta,Â’ totally impure, only fit to be given to the dogs.
В 
Although I had relaxed my standards a lot over the years, the thought of now
serving this pasta dish to Jean really pushed my limits. Well, there was nothing else
ready. He was ravenously hungry, had asked me to hurry, and this dish was what he
was expecting.
В 
I fished out a piece of pasta from the pot, hoping it was the right one and threw it
away. I went out feeling very uncomfortable, but served the dish to Jean anyway.
He ate it with great appreciation.
В 
I had served Jean many delicious dishes in the past. By it's own merits, this one
wasn't all that tasty. Jean looked at me when he had finished eating, smiled, his
eyes softened. "That", he said, "is the most delicious thing I have ever eaten in my
life."
В 
Someone once remarked that the word for mind and heart in the Thai language were
the same. "That is because the mind dissolves in the heart," Jean explained.
В 
Because I met Jean so late in his life, I was only able to attend one seminar with
him. It was held in Greece. At one talk he said, “One day you will find that you are
the ultimate subject.” That statement stayed with me, and gradually I've begun to
understand what he meant.
В 
While teaching a yoga class Jean told us, “When you breath in, it is a receiving.
When you breath out, it is an offering.”
В 
A student of Jean's drove him to Athens after the seminar. I was given a lift to
the airport on their way into town. As I got out of the car I said to Jean, Г‚вЂ˜I hope
to see you in California.” He replied, “You will know when I am there.”
В 
A few months later Jean had a massive stroke in London. He was never able to
teach again. When he returned to California I went to Santa Barbara to cook for
him, but the Jean I knew and loved, the personality I was attached to was no
longer accessible to me.
В 
The night before I left, I cooked a beautiful dinner for Jean with all of his
favorite dishes. The next morning his attendant told me that before going to sleep
Jean had said, "I have just had a Moroccan wedding feast."
В 
At the time I didnÂ’t understood the full import of Jean's teachings, but that didn't
seem to bother him. He seemed to love me and enjoy my company despite my
ignorance. To me, he appeared as my "enlightened" grandfather, a great master,
whose company I was briefly privileged to share.
В 
Now, days when I go for a walk in nature and look around me with a renewed sense
of wonder regained in JeanÂ’s presence, I remember his words, “When you breath in,
it is a receiving. When you breath out, it is an offering.” Thank you Jean.
В 
Shared with permission. Copyright by Dhanya Ji.

Group: NDhighlights Message: 4650 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-07-11
Subject: #4650 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В #4650 - Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
The Nonduality Highlights -В http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/
В 
В 

В 
В 
Considering the previous two issues of the Highlights were about Dr. Jean Klein, I invited James Traverse, who studied with Jean, to compose a piece for the Highlights. It's a beautiful essay. Thanks, James. JamesВ has beenВ a Yoga and nonduality teacher/educator for over 25 years and was one of the early contributors to Nonduality Salon.
В 
В 

В 
В 

What You Are is Prior to Consciuousness

by James Traverse

The only accurate test of what you truly are is experiencing. Authentic yoga is a means of this.

Patanjali, who is said to be the father of language, medicine and yoga, provided the definition of yoga within the first four sutras of his Г‚вЂ˜Yoga SutrasÂ’ as follows [it is important to notice that the definition Patanjali gives in these sutras is twofold as what yoga is and what it isnÂ’t]:


atha yoga 'nusasana?

Now Yoga [now, after appropriate preparation, communication of yoga-now]

yogas citta v?tti nirodha?

Yoga is the cessation of the whirling, the wrong turning, of the mind

tada dra??u? svarupe 'vasthana?

then the Seer, Awareness, abides in its own nature

v?tti sarupyam itaratra

at other times the Seer, Awareness, assumes the forms of the mental fluctuations


When you explore the rest of PatanjaliÂ’s Yoga Sutras you will discover that he, and every other sage, directs you to Г‚вЂ˜Know ThyselfÂ’ and that Patanjali plainly states that this is the aim of authentic yoga.

In light of the fact that yoga is truly about Г‚вЂ˜Knowing ThyselfÂ’, it is clear that it is not about being able to do some contorted yoga pose or developing some extraordinary powers. This means that everyday activities can be a yoga practice and two particularly appropriate ones are to take note of the experiences of falling asleep at night and waking up in the morning.

The great benefit of taking note of falling asleep and waking up is the fact that you do not have to believe anything; you simply observe the fact that these events happen. At night, when you fall asleep, ask Г‚вЂ˜what is it that falls asleepÂ’. Then in the morning ask, Г‚вЂ˜what is it that wakes upÂ’, and, most importantly, ask, Г‚вЂ˜what is it that sees this?Â’

These questions are answered experientially. Most folks would say, Г‚вЂ˜I fall asleepÂ’ and Г‚вЂ˜I wake upÂ’, and they would be correct, yet they miss the fact that there is a knower, which is Awareness or the Seer, that sees the falling asleep and waking up. This fact is obvious once it is pointed out, and then the same folks realize that it is consciousness that falls asleep and it is consciousness that wakes up. Thus it is experientially self-evident that what you are is Г‚вЂ˜Prior to ConsciousnessÂ’ and that it is Present and Aware.

The other mind-altering insight that is available here is that the experience is determined by oneÂ’s stance. Most folks have been conditioned to take the stance of identifying with the mind and body, which is another way of saying that they have identified with name and form [or as Patanjali says, Г‚вЂ˜at other times the Seer, Awareness, assumes the forms of the mental fluctuationsÂ’]. When they see the simple fact that there is a knower, a Seer- Awareness, that sees consciousness arising in the morning and falling away at night [this is seen during sleep or when under anesthesia and later Г‚вЂ˜waking upÂ’] then there is the invitation to Г‚вЂ˜Stand as AwarenessÂ’ such that experiencing is Г‚вЂ˜Knowing as Being.Â’

Г‚вЂ˜Knowing as BeingÂ’ is knowledge yet it is not the knowledge of book-learning that is associated with the conscious mind. It is an order of knowing that is beyond the conscious mind because it is non-conceptual - and everyone has had the experience. It is the realm of being when there is astonishment, a crisis situation, real welcoming, and/or in true Love.

Thus authentic yoga practise is a means of knowing your true nature as Awareness, which is prior to consciousness, and taking stance as such. Then all appearances, including consciousness, are described by the conscious mind as arisings in Awareness, like waves in the ocean or branches of the same tree, such that the only thing available for them to be made out of is yourself, Awareness, in the form that has arisen.

In this way authentic yoga is knowing as being, which can be most appropriately stated as Love.

Peace Now ~ Love Always

James


Group: NDhighlights Message: 4651 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-07-11
Subject: #4651 - Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
#4651 - Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
The Nonduality Highlights -В http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/
В 
В 

В 
В 
Here's the newest Guest Teaching Series post on Awakening Clarity, this one from teacher and author, Stephen Bodian.В  To read the whole post, or twenty other guest posts, click here:В  http://awakeningclarity.blogspot.com/
В 
WAKE UP NOW
A Guide to the Journey of Spiritual Awakening

by
Stephan Bodian

Although spiritual awakening itself is generally a blissful, expansive experience that may be accompanied by weeks or months of extraordinary inner peace, joy, love, and freedom from reactivity, it's often followed by an extended period of insecurity and confusion. After all, you've just experienced the most profound paradigm shift imaginable--the seeming center of your universe, the separate self you've spent a lifetime cultivating and serving, has revealed itself to be a colossal illusion. Even though you may have encountered spiritual teachings that helped prepare you for this tectonic shift in consciousness, the experience itself can be frightening and disorienting as your accustomed world collapses around you.

In particular, the ego may feel threatened by the radiant emptiness that has revealed itself to be your essence, your true nature, and it will do everything it knows how to make you forget who you are. (Remember, that's its job description, its reason for being, and it's been doing its job well for a very long time.) Committed to seeing itself as a separate someone with a particular life story--with all the suffering and exhilaration, success and failure, this story brings--the ego is terrified of being annihilated. The tactics it employs may be heavy-handed or subtle and range from trying to stuff awakening back into a conceptual box to attempting to co-opt awakening for its own purposes. But the result is the same: the clouding or distortion of the truth to which you've just awakened and the reassertion of the ego's control. Here are seven of the ego's favorite ploys.
В 
В 

В 
В 
A HUMANISED NONDUALITY
В 
by Jeff Foster
В 
В 
In an increasingly depersonalised world of faceless internet forums and forms and unloved factories churning out unloved and unwanted plastic, it seems to me that the last thing we need is an Г‚вЂ˜I am not a person and neither are youÂ’ philosophy pretending to be the absolute truth yet devoid of basic human compassion; a philosophy that was originally imported from India and then totally misunderstood, warped, distorted and even abused by the western mind desperately trying to nourish its own already-depersonalised and faceless conditioning.
В 
Since when did spirituality, with all its beautiful and transformative potential, become about simply believing that youÂ’re Г‚вЂ˜not a personÂ’, that you donÂ’t have a body and that you care about nothing because thereÂ’s nothing to care about, and Г‚вЂ˜nobody thereÂ’ to care anyway? Since when did freedom get mixed up so badly with nihilism? It is a gross misunderstanding of Advaita and it only feeds the already depersonalised and disembodied ego that is running rampant.
В 
Whenever I hear someone using the words Г‚вЂ˜I am nobodyÂ’ or Г‚вЂ˜there is no choiceÂ’ to justify any kind of violence, inner or outer, or to protect themselves from human intimacy or pain or a sense of responsibility; whenever I stumble across a Facebook argument between two non-existent egos fighting to prove to each other how non-existent their egos are or how far Г‚вЂ˜beyond the personalÂ’ they have gone, I hear Ramana Maharshi and all the saints and sages who knew deeply that clarity and love cannot be divided, sighing with basic human compassion, and infinite patience.

В 

В 
В 
В 
Taoist expression of non-duality
В 
Without the concept of an other,
There is no separate I.
Without the sense of an I,
nothing can be seen as other.
There is some power that determines things,
but I donÂ’t know what it is.
It has no form or substance,
acts without doing,
keeps the whole universe in order,
and seems to get along
perfectly well without me.
В 
~ Chuang-tzu
В 
_________

Trans. Stephen Mitchell, Г‚вЂ˜The Second Book of the TaoÂ’ (Penguin Books, 2009)


Group: NDhighlights Message: 4652 From: Gloria Lee Date: 2012-07-13
Subject: #4652 - Thursday, July 12, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee

#4652 -В Thursday, July 12, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
В 
В 
В 
"Love is the way messengers from the mystery tell us things."
~ Rumi
В 
В 
Love is the actual form of God;
Love is the real form of the Self,
that is pure bliss;
Love is the nature of the Self.
~ Ramana Maharshi

В 
В 
When all the false self-identifications are thrown away, what remains is
all-embracing love.
~ Nisargadatta Maharaj
В 
В 
В 
You already are intimately familiar with your true Self - simply stay
with that pure light of aliveness, that very simple and ordinary sense of being.
Watch how the thoughts and assumptions seem to color this pure light of Self with
identification, yet these can only come and go BECAUSE OF this pure Self that
you are.
~ Randall Friend
В 
You Are Dreaming
http://avastu0.blogspot.com
В 
В 
В 
Relationships aren't here to make you happy. They're here to make you conscious.
~ Eckhart Tolle
В 
В 
Be widening pond-ripples after the pebble disappears.
Millions will feel a breath on their cheeks.
Circle me in your vanishing, as I encircle you.
We're waves of one another now.
Love's generous center only knows
... opening, emptying, trembling into stillness.
Worlds float in us like water lilies.
Earth is the one that has just blossomed.
~ Fred LaMotte
В 
В 
Beannacht....by John O'Donohue
A beautiful blessing, originally written for the poet's mother,
*************************

On the day when
...
the weight deadens
on your shoulders
and you stumble,
may the clay dance
to balance you.

And when your eyes
freeze behind
the grey window
and the ghost of loss
gets in to you,
may a flock of colours,
indigo, red, green,
and azure blue
come to awaken in you
a meadow of delight.

When the canvas frays
in the currach of thought
and a stain of ocean
blackens beneath you,
may there come across the waters
a path of yellow moonlight
to bring you safely home.

May the nourishment of the earth be yours,
may the clarity of light be yours,
may the fluency of the ocean be yours,
may the protection of the ancestors be yours.

And so may a slow
wind work these words
of love around you,
an invisible cloak
to mind your life.
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4653 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-07-13
Subject: #4653 - Friday, July 13, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
#4653 - Friday, July 13, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
The Nonduality Highlights -В http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/
В 
В 

В 
В 
В 
List of Seven (1): Short Masterpieces of Non-Duality
В 
Posted: July 12, 2012 | Author: Echo of the Absolute | Filed under: Basics | Tags: non-duality, enlightenment, zen, scripture, philosophy, atmananda, upanishad, sutra, buddha, taoism, ox | Leave a comment Г‚Вป
В 
In this post I would like to share with you a list of 7 short and succinct masterpieces of non-dual philosophy. While each of these texts takes less than 20 minutes to read, they can take up to a lifetime to understand. Hence, they are true classics, good in the beginning, in the middle, and in the end of a spiritual Г‚вЂ˜journeyÂ’. Enjoy!
В 
В 
Atma-Nirvriti
Sri Atmananda (Krishna Menon)
Hinduism
http://pgoodnight.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/atma-nirvriti.pdf
В 
В 
В 
В 
В 
В 
Leave a comment for the blogger:
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4654 From: Mark Date: 2012-07-16
Subject: #4654 - Saturday/Sunday, July 14/15, 2012

Archived issues of the NDHighlights are available online: http://nonduality.com/hlhome.htm

Nonduality Highlights Issue #4654, Saturday/Sunday, July 14/15, 2012





O SERVANT, where dost thou seek Me?
Lo! I am beside thee.
I am neither in temple nor in mosque: I am neither in Kaaba nor in Kailash:
Neither am I in rites and ceremonies, nor in Yoga and renunciation.
If thou art a true seeker, thou shalt at once see Me: thou shalt meet Me in a moment of time.
KabГѓВฎr says, "O Sadhu! God is the breath of all breath."

- Kabir from The Songs of Kabir, translated by Rabindranath Tagore




The Fullness Of Peace

Not for me is the love that knows no restraint
and is like foaming wine that, having burst its
vessel in a moment, would run to waste.

Send me the love that is cool and pure like
Your rain, which blesses the thirsty earth and fills
the homely earthen jars.

Send me the love that would soak down into
the center of being, and from there would spread
like the unseen sap through the branching tree of
life, giving birth to fruits and flowers.

Send me the love that keeps the heart still
with the fullness of peace.

- Rabindranath Tagor from The Heart Of God, posted to The_Now2




TELL me, Brother, how can I renounce Maya?
When I gave up the tying of ribbons, still I tied my garment about me:
When I gave up tying my garment, still I covered my body in its folds.
So, when I give up passion, I see that anger remains;
And when I renounce anger, greed is with me still;
And when greed is vanquished, pride and vainglory remain;
When the mind is detached and casts Maya away, still it clings to the letter.
KabГѓВฎr says, "Listen to me, dear Sadhu! the true path is rarely found."

- Kabir from The Songs of Kabir, translated by Rabindranath Tagore




O FRIEND! hope for Him whilst you live, know whilst you live, understand whilst you live: for in life deliverance abides.
If your bonds be not broken whilst living, what hope of deliverance in death?
It is but an empty dream, that the soul shall have union with Him because it has passed from the body:
If He is found now, He is found then,
If not, we do but go to dwell in the City of Death.
If you have union now, you shall have it hereafter.
Bathe in the truth, know the true Guru, have faith in the true Name!
KabГѓВฎr says: "It is the Spirit of the quest which helps; I am the slave of this Spirit of the quest."

- Kabir from The Songs of Kabir, translated by Rabindranath Tagore






Do not go to the garden of flowers!
O Friend! go not there;
In your body is the garden of flowers.
Take your seat on the thousand petals of the lotus, and there gaze on the Infinite Beauty.

- Kabir from The Songs of Kabir, translated by Rabindranath Tagore




The Meeting When the friend opens the door and says,
You are here, please come in.
It is such a pleasure to give up talking
and listen to his long story
about Khidr, the guide of souls.

A tailor cuts cloth uniquely for each person.
Springs open in the center of the lake.
Trees move in the breeze that comes before dawn.

A nightingale sits in the rosebush and asks,
Who do you love? Tell me.
No one else is here.

The rose, So long as you are you,
I cannot. This is the passionate demand,
the one the burning bush made of Moses.

I am a sacred pool. Take off your shoes.
Wade in. You are the essence
of place and placelessness, honored one.
Take my hand.

The needle's eye will not accept
a strand of thread that is folded double.

So it is with you.
You find yourself holding the royal bowl
and welcoming all to the banquet.

The sun stands in the fire up to its chin
so we can have daylight.

When you take the hand of someone you love,
what happens to those hands?

Your darling comes, and you ask,
How can I help? Come here.

Reason wonders, Should I go?
And your loving, Should I run?

The one you love signals,
Yes. I want both of you.

The table is there. Sit down,
Choose the bright company.
Do not worry about food.

Now I pass to you this silence,
so that the alternations of night and day
with their flaming language
may finish the story.

- Rumi Ghazal 45, in a poetic version by Professor Coleman Barks, posted to Sunlight



Group: NDhighlights Message: 4655 From: Gloria Lee Date: 2012-07-16
Subject: #4655 - Monday, July 16, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee

#4655 -В Monday, July 16, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
В 
В 
В 
"There are an awful lot of scientists today
who believe that before very long
we shall have unraveled all the secrets of the universe.
There will be no puzzles anymore.
To me it'd be really, really tragic
because I think one of the most exciting things
is this feeling of mystery, feeling of awe,
the feeling of looking at a little live thing
and being amazed by it
and how its emerged through these hundreds of years
of evolution and there it is and it is perfect and why."
~ Jane Goodall
В 
В 
"I have arrived" is a practice, not a statement or declaration.
...I have arrived in the here and the now, and I can touch life
deeply with all it's wonders. The rain is a wonder, the sunshine
is a wonder, the trees are a wonder, the faces of children are a
wonder. There are so many wonders of life around you and
inside you. You eyes are a wonder, you need only to open them..
В 
~ Thich Nhat Hanh
В 
В 
В 
В 
В 
В 
В 
words by Fred LaMotte
collages by Rashani Rea
В 
В 
В 
В 
As sunlight is attributed to the moon, so is the
Beloved's form ascribed to the lover; but in truth
В 
By Fakhruddin Iraqi
(? - 1289)
В 
В 
В 
As sunlight is attributed to the moon, so is the
Beloved's form ascribed to the lover; but in truth
В 
each image painted
В В В В В В В В В  on the canvas of existence
is the form
В В В В В В В В В  of the artist himself.
Eternal Ocean
В В В В В В В В В  spews forth new waves.
"Waves" we call them;
В В В В В В В В В  but there is only the Sea.
В 
В 
В 
English version by William Chittick and Peter Lamborn Wilson
В 
-- from Fakhruddin Iraqi: Divine Flashes (Classics of Western
Spirituality) , Translated by William Chittick / Translated by
Nasr Seyyed Hossein
Poetry Chaikhana
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4656 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-07-18
Subject: #4656 - Tuesday, July 17, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
#4656 - Tuesday, July 17, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
The Nonduality Highlights -В http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/
В 
В 

В 

I Try Too Hard

by Vicki Woodyard

I have this scribbled on an index card. I wrote it down quickly when I heard George Clooney В say it on TV.

“You try too hard. Just say Г‚вЂ˜I suck!Â’ The minute you let go, you get better.”

Okay. I suck at selling books. I am a shy-violet, hard-core introvert. I have been invited to do a book signing and the very idea paralyzes me. Okay. I suck at signing books. IÂ’m ALREADY better at it, according to George Clooney.

I SUCK at remembering names, too. Does that mean I immediately get better at it, Mr. Bloombottom I mean....Mr. Boombutt...I mean Mr. Buttbloomer.В  Oh, screw sucking at stuff.

No, seriously, I suck at anything requiring a personality. I let go of my ego and immediately I get better. I immediately get a sort of pie-in-the-sky enlightenment with CoolWhip Clouds on top and edible underwear on Jesus. Jesus, that was a tacky thing to write. I am just now getting better.

Jesus does not, I repeat, does not wear edible underwear. If He did, He would be SuperMegaJesus. I suck.


Vicki Woodyard

http://www.amazon.com/LIFE-HOLE-Thats-Wisdom-Awakened/dp/1609102770/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1300842477&sr=8-1

В 


В 

Perhaps it is nonduality as we see it emerging that is the religion "stripped and plain," "of simplicity and scope," as H.G. Wells describes it below. Thanks to Wayne Ferguson for sending this to us.
В 
Not sure if I ever shared this with any of you, but I often think that Nonduality (loosely speaking) is going to provide the context in which this "prophesy" will be fulfilled (dovetailing nicely with Sufism & Contemplative Christianity--not to mention Hinduism and Buddhism).В  Eckhart Tolle's popularity marked the point of critical mass -- just a matter of time now... :-)
В 
The Future Role of Religion in Education, by H.G. Wells

Note: This is an excerpt from H.G. Wells' Outline of History

The overriding powers that hitherto in the individual soul and in the community have struggled and prevailed against the ferocious, base, and individual impulses that divide us from one another, have been the powers of religion and education.

Religion and education, those closely interwoven influences, have made possible the greater human societies whose growth we have traced in this Outline, they have been the chief synthetic forces throughout this great story of enlarging human co-operations that we have traced from its beginnings. We have found in the intellectual and theological conflicts of the nineteenth century the explanation of that curious exceptional disentanglement of religious teaching from formal education which is a distinctive feature of our age, and we have traced the consequences of this phase of religious disputation and confusion in the reversion of international politics towards a brutal nationalism and in the backward drift of industrial and business life towards harsh, selfish, and uncreative profit-seeking. There has been a slipping off of ancient restraints; a real decivilization of men's minds. We would lay stress here on the suggestion that this divorce of religious teaching from organized education is necessarily a temporary one, a transitory dislocation, and that presently education must become again in intention and spirit religious, and that the impulse to devotion, to universal service and to a complete escape from self, which has been the common underlying force in all the great religions of the last five and twenty centuries, an impulse which ebbed so perceptibly during the prosperity, laxity, disillusionment, and scepticism of the past seventy or eighty years, will reappear again, stripped and plain, as the recognized fundamental structural impulse in human society.

Education is the preparation of the individual for the community, and his religious training is the core of that preparation. With the great intellectual restatements and expansions of the nineteenth century, an educational break-up, a confusion and loss of aim in education, was inevitable. We can no longer prepare the individual for a community when our ideas of a community are shattered and undergoing reconstruction. The old loyalties, the old too limited and narrow political and social assumptions, the old too elaborate religious formulae, have lost their power of conviction, and the greater ideas of a world state and of an economic commonweal have been winning their way only very slowly to recognition. So far they have swayed only a minority of exceptional people. But out of the trouble and tragedy of this present time there may emerge a moral and intellectual revival, a religious revival, of a simplicity and scope to draw together men of alien races and now discrete traditions into one common and sustained way of living for the world's service. We cannot foretell the scope and power of such a revival; we cannot even produce evidence of its onset. The beginnings of such things are never conspicuous. Great movements of the racial soul come at first like a thief in the night, and then suddenly are discovered to be powerful and world-wide. Religious emotion—stripped of corruptions and freed from its last priestly entanglements—may presently blow, through life again like a great wind, bursting the doors and flinging open the shutters of the individual life, and making many things possible and easy that in these present days of exhaustion seem almost too difficult to desire.

[Note: This selection has been excerpted from the 1923 "Definitive Edition" of H.G. Wells' Outline of History. It can be found in Chapter XLI, entitled, "The Next Stage of History". The title, "The Future Role of Religion in Education", and the special emphasis is my own. -Wayne Ferguson]
В 
В 


“When it is understood that one loses joy and happiness in the attempt to possess them, the essence of natural farming will be realized. The ultimate goal of farming is not the growing of crops, but the cultivation and perfection of human beings.”

? Masanobu Fukuoka, The One-Straw Revolution
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4657 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-07-19
Subject: #4657 - Wednesday, July 18, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
#4657 - Wednesday, July 18, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
The Nonduality Highlights -В http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/
В 
В 

В 
В 
Dear Fellow Explorer, Here is the latest poem inspired by a chapter of the same name from the new book 'Awakening and Beyond', Love, Colin
В 
В 
Why Do Anything?
В 
by Colin Drake
В 
“Why do anything?”, a reader asks,
В 
“If with Awareness I identify,
В 
В WouldnÂ’t one just sit back and bask,
В 
В In this new definition of I ?”
В 
В 
В 
В For Awareness is always at peace,
В 
Absolutely silent and utterly still,
В 
As This surely desires would cease,
В 
Needing nothing more for life to fill.
В 
В 
В 
However, this overlooks the measure,
В 
Of body/mind and the creation,
В 
Manifest for Its self-knowing and pleasure,
В 
Achieved by apparent separation.
В 
В 
В 
In which we are all instruments,
В 
Through which Awareness can enjoy and sense,
В 
Sights, sounds, feelings, tastes and the scents,
В 
Of the cosmos Г‚вЂฆ so immense.
В 
В 
В 
Body/mind is like a Г‚вЂ˜virtual reality hostÂ’
В 
In which Awareness is the Г‚вЂ˜playerÂ’,
В 
Aiming to live and enjoy to the utmost
В 
The world through this Г‚вЂ˜outer layerÂ’.
В 
В 
В 
Deeper than this we can find,
В 
The constant subjectiveВ  presence,
В 
Consciousness, perceiving body/mind,
В 
Of all things the ultimate essence.
В 
В 
В 
So by living life to the full,
В 
And discovering the true inner Self,
В 
We can the function of manifestation fulfill,
В 
Awareness enjoying and Г‚вЂ˜knowing ItselfÂ’.
В 
~ ~ ~
В 
Colin Drake's e-books are available at
В 
В 

В 
В 
I know the term “non-dual thinking” is still new or strange to many people. It simply means our ability to read the moment, to read reality in a way that is not judgmental, a way that is not exclusionary of the part that we donÂ’t understand. And it takes practice to learn that. ItÂ’s very interesting that the term “non-dual” is taken for granted in three of the Eastern religions: Taoism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. This word would be very familiar to them because itÂ’s the best descriptor of high-level consciousness—when you donÂ’t split everything up according to what you like and what you donÂ’t like. You leave the moment open, you let it be what it is in itself, and you let it speak to you.
В 
I was able to reintroduce this word for many people in my book, The Naked Now. I would like to continue to build on that because I think itÂ’s central to the reform of religion, to our own spiritual progress, and really to building a necessary bridge between East and West. We had it in the West, but we called it “unitive” consciousness. So itÂ’s just a different word for the same reality. “Non-dual,” however, forces Westerners to struggle, so I think weÂ’ll keep using it. Reality is not totally one, but it is not totally two, either! Stay with that necessary dilemma, and it can make you wise.
В 
~ Richard Rohr, 2012
Adapted from Fr. RichardÂ’s teachings on his lineage.
В 
Buy The Naked Now at Amazon.com:
В 
В 
В 

В 

One Track Heart: The Story of Krishna Das won best documentary at Maui Film Festival, June 2012.В 
В 
trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vY3ot_4hq2o&feature=player_embedded
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4658 From: Gloria Lee Date: 2012-07-20
Subject: #4658 - Thursday, July 19, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee

#4658 -В Thursday, July 19, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
The Nonduality Highlights http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/В 
В 
В 
В 
The Truth About Truth
The dangers of literalism
by Rita M. Gross
В 
excerpt:
One of our most urgent tasks as modern dharma practitioners is to
learn how to take traditional stories seriously without taking them
literally. That is to say, we need to learn how to live in the frameworks
of both the European Enlightenment and Buddhism, without one
negating or subjugating the other. One of the wisest statements about
history and story that I have ever encountered was spoken by Black
Elk, a holy man of the Lakota nation during the 19th and 20th
centuries. In Black Elk Speaks, he narrates one of the LakotaÂ’s most
important stories, a story about how the sacred pipe first came to the
people. This story is filled with events that are difficult to take
literally, such as women turning into buffaloes. At the storyÂ’s
conclusion, Black Elk said, “This they tell and whether it happened so
or not, I do not know; but if you think about it you can see that it is
true.”
В 
The main point made in this simple statement is that, contrary to
literalist suppositions, truth is not always about observable facts or
events. Truth can also reveal itself in deep contemplation of stories
and symbols. The truth of a story does not depend on whether it could
have been captured by a camcorder. Its truth is found in realms of
imagination and contemplation, in its symbolic meanings. Even though
much of his spiritual life is based on the symbolism and rituals
associated with the sacred pipe, Black Elk himself is skeptical about
his narrative as a factual account of its origins. Thus the same story
can be regarded as both true and false: false as a factual account of
an empirical event and true as the symbolic charter for oneÂ’s
spirituality. But in the wake of the European Enlightenment, with its
according of sole prestige and validity to facts, people have come to
see things otherwise.
В 

В 
photo by Alan Larus
В 
В 
The poet lives and writes at the frontier between deep internal
experience and the revelations of the outer world. There is no
going back for the poet once this frontier has been reached; a
new territory is visible and what has been said cannot be unsaid.
The discipline of poetry is in overhearing yourself say difficult
truths from which it is impossible to retreat. Poetry is a break
for freedom. ...In a sense all poems are good; all poems are an
emblem of courage and the attempt to say the unsayable; but only
a few are able to speak to something universal yet personal and
distinct at the same time; to create a door through which others
can walk into what previously seemed unobtainable realms, in the
passage of a few short lines.
В 
~David Whyte
В 
via Rashani RГѓВฉa on Facebook
В 

В 
В 
There is nothing in this world which does not speak.
В 
Every thing and every being is continually calling out its nature, its character, its secret;
В 
the more the inner sense is open, the more capable it becomes of hearing the voice of all things.
В 
If the soul were awakened to feel what the birds feel when singing in the forest at dawn,
В 
man would know that their prayer is even more exalting than his own, for it is more natural.
В 
.
В 
There is nothing in the world which is not the instrument of God.
В 
.
В 
Sound is the sign of life; in the temples of gods and goddesses,
В 
in Hindu churches, bells ringing show life even in the silence.
В 
Sound is hidden under words, and words are hidden under sound.
В 
When one perceives the words, one does not perceive the sound underneath,
В 
and when one perceives sound, one does not perceive the words underneath.
В 
When the poet perceives words, the musician perceives sound underneath.
В 
The mystic perceives even in that sound a Word which was God.
В 
.
В 
Tone continues, time expires.
В 
Tone lives on time, time assimilates tone.
В 
God is not in time. Therefore He is in the silence.
В 
Sound is part of the world of time.
В 
.
В 
Rhythm cannot exist without tone, nor tone without rhythm.
В 
They are interdependent for their existence, and it is the same with time and space.
В 
.
В 
Noisiness comes from restlessness, and restlessness is the destructive rhythm.
В 
.
В 
Man's atmosphere explains the condition of his soul.
В 
The further we go, so the more our disputes and arguments cease.
В 
They fade away until there is no color left in them; and when all the color has gone,
В 
the white light comes which is the light of God.
В 
.
В 
Nirvana means no color. What is color? Right or wrong, sin or virtue - all this is color,
В 
and in the realm of truth they fade away, as every color fades in the brightness of light.
В 
He who has realized this has entered nirvana.
В 
.
В 
.
В 
A Sufi must always recognize in God the source of all things and the origin of all beings.
В 
A Sufi must observe in the continual unfoldment of the spirit the birth of the soul.
В 
.
В 
~ Pir-O-Murshid Hazrat Inayat Khan
В 
photos by Alan Larus
Group: NDhighlights Message: 4659 From: Jerry Katz Date: 2012-07-21
Subject: #4659 - Friday, July 20, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
#4659 - Friday, July 20, 2012 - Editor: Jerry Katz
В 
The Nonduality Highlights -В http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/
В 
В 

В 
В 
The Endless Further: Wayfaring on the Buddha Path
В 
blogged by David M. Riley/Rev. Vajra Dharmasamvara
В 
В 
Inspector Maigret on Non-duality

Buddhism, Taoism Add comments
Jul 20 2012
В 
IÂ’ve always been a fan of detective stories, and over the years, one of the detectives I have enjoyed the most is Jules Maigret, Commissaire de la Police Judiciaire, the creation of Georges Simenon. The Maigret novels are short, and written in a spare and simple style. Deceptively simple. Maigret is a detective whoÂ’s often more interested in whydunit, than whodunit. I canÂ’t recall the Inspector ever using a gun. His weapon of choice is his psychological insight.
В 
ThereÂ’s a certain Buddhist/Taoist quality about Maigret. As Pierre Weisz wrote in his essay, Simenon and Г‚вЂ˜Le Commissaire,Â’ “MaigretÂ’s great asset is being there.” Maigret has his own unique way of working cases, and many times, heÂ’s like Lao TzuÂ’s sage, who “goes about doing nothing.” It may seem like heÂ’s doing nothing, perhaps strolling along the banks of the Seine smoking his pipe, or having a casual beer in a small Paris cafe, but actually heÂ’s deep into an investigation of the causes and conditions behind the actions of both the guilty and the innocent.
В 
My cable company carries the MHZ Network (KCET) which has “International Mysteries,” currently featuring Beck, a Swedish police detective, based on the novels by Sjowall and Wahloo, who were pioneers of Scandinavian crime fiction in the Г‚вЂ˜60s and Г‚вЂ˜70s; Inspector Montablano, created by Italian writer Andrea Camilleri, an absolutely great series (and great books); and Maigret. The Maigret series was produced for French TV in the 1990s and are set in the times of the novels.
В 
I was watching “Maigret and the Candle Auction” http://www.kcet.org/shows/maigret/maigret-and-the-candle-auction.htmlВ last night, and I forget what the other character said to provoke this response, but Maigret said, “Happiness is just dormant sadness.”
В 
It seemed to me that Maigret was making an important point about non-duality. That was probably not his intent, and possibly not SimenonÂ’s either, assuming the line was taken from the book.
В 
It reminded me of something I read by Krishnamurti not long ago:
В 
В В В  "There is sorrow. My son is dead. I do not move away. Where is the duality? It is only when I say I have lost my companion, my son, that duality comes into being."
В 
Even though we talk about the cessation of suffering, there really is none. Suffering is never completely absent. Sadness at the loss of a loved one, for instance, never leaves. Not even after decades. I know. Like Buddha Nature the potential for suffering exists within us always, and can arise at any time. Peace is just dormant suffering.
В 
Sadness and happiness are advaita: two, but not two. They are non-dual. Duality comes into being when we begin to make distinctions and comparisons. And cessation comes into being when we stop suffering from ruling, and ruining, our lives.
В 
В В В  When the mind exists undisturbed in the Way,
В В В  nothing in the world can offend,
В В В  and when a thing can no longer offend,
В В В  it ceases to exist in the old way.
В 
В В В  Seng-tsÂ’an, Verses on the Heart-Mind
В 
Just in case youÂ’d like to learn more about the novels of George Simenon and his character, Inspector Maigret, hop over to pattinase http://pattinase.blogspot.com/, the blog of Patti Abbott, a writer of short stories, and check out FridayÂ’s Forgotten Books http://pattinase.blogspot.com/2012/07/fridays-forgotten-books-july-20-2012.html. This week the bloggers at taking a look at SimenonÂ’s work.
В 
Posted by David at 12:44 am Tagged with: Georges Simenon, Krishnamurti, Maigret, non-dualism
В 
2 Responses to “Inspector Maigret on Non-duality”
В 
В В В  Steve says:В 
В В В  July 20, 2012 at 2:36 pmВ 
В 
В В В  There was a series of Maigret on BBC some time ago – look like there's still some available:
В В В  http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00fzxgt/episodes/guide
В 
В В В  ReplyВ 
В В В В В В В  David says:В 
В В В В В В В  July 20, 2012 at 3:06 pmВ 
В 
В В В В В В В  Yes, thatÂ’s from the French series I was talking about with Bruno Cremer as Maigret. In French with English subtitles, filmed in realistic, rustic, funky settings. The BBC actually produced their own Maigret series some years ago, staring Michael Gambon. They were okay, but only an hour long as I recall and didnÂ’t capture the flavor of Maigret as well as the French programs did. The only fictional detective to appear in film more often than Maigret is Sherlock Holmes.

top of page